CEREMONIES, RITUALS, CELEBRATIONS,
MUSIC AND STORIES

Ceremonialist Addicks is available to conduct life-transition ceremonies, rituals and celebrations including: weddings, house blessings, anointing with holy oil and laying on of hands with prayers for healing, coming of age, celebration of pregnancy and parenthood, leave-taking, parting, loss of a loved one, retirement, recognition of becoming an elder, funerals and burials, and other rituals, ceremonies and celebrations. Ceremonialist Addicks is also available to perform ancient and traditional music from around the world on Native American Indian style flutes, concert bass guitar, and a variety of percussion instruments for weddings, funerals, burials, banquets, receptions and other events.

Addicks is available only in the greater Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, metropolitan area including the neighboring areas of Wisconsin. Addicks resides in on the border between Falcon Heights and St. Paul. For pricing (fees are usually a flat rate of $500 to conduct ceremonies and $400 for his elder tales and ghost story programs, and $400 for flute playing) and availability, contact Addicks at 651-643-0622 or addicks.storyflute@gmail.com

Qualifications: Addicks received his Bachelor of Arts in anthropology and Juris Doctor in law degrees from the University of Minnesota and his Master of Arts in religious studies at the ecumenical United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. He has done post-graduate work in the anthropology of music, performance on ethnic instruments and ethnomusicology at Liberty University Baptist Seminary and Graduate School, and is currently studying Theology and the Arts at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. As a lay minister, Addicks has led worship services in many different Protestant denominations, including Lutheran (ELCA), Episcopalian and the United Church of Christ. He is authorized to conduct marriage ceremonies in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Although he has practiced law in Minnesota and before the United States Supreme Court for forty six years, Addicks does not provide legal services in connection with any of the ceremonies he conducts.

Addicks is a “living storytelling legend” also known as “Minnesota’s Master of Real Ghost Stories”.

For more about his True Ghost Stories and his Elder Tales, and other programs, see: DukeAddicksStoryteller.

 

Duke Addicks leads a chapel service at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, in which he tells the story of "St. Dorothy and the Lawyers," plays African drum, Native American Indian style flute and steel Moyo drum. Enjoy! Direct link to YouTube

The Hohle Fels flute

This 35,000-year-old five-hole flute, 8 ½ inches long, made of griffon vulture bone, is the oldest musical instrument. Read an Associated Press article on this and other prehistoric flutes.

Read a National Geographic news article about this and other ancient bone flutes.

When I listen to a replica of the Hohle Fels flute being played, it sounds like this 35,000-year-old flute is tuned to a pentatonic scale, the major scale beginning on E flat, and the minor pentatonic scale beginning on C.

So the major pentatonic scale to which this flute is tuned is E flat, F, G, B flat, C, E flat, and the minor pentatonic scale would be C, E flat, F, G, B flat C. The lowest note playable appears to be the E flat and the highest the E flat one octave above it.

Most Native American Indian-style flutes are tuned to the minor pentatonic scale. Perhaps others have made this comparison of what is being called the Hohle Fels flute with the Native American Indian style flute.

Click here for Duke's Storyteller Page

 

Last updated on 6/29/12

DUKE ADDICKS

Plays the music behind the melodies of Tribal, Ancient, Celtic and Early American Tunes on Native American Indian Flutes
and
Tells the legends and lore behind the music he plays.

Learn about

Duke the Flute Player

The Sacred Flute

Metis, Modal and Mdewakanton tunes

Duke the Storyteller

What is the music behind the melodies that Duke is so concerned about discerning? The answers to that question are being written up and should appear on this site soon.

But Duke’s music on his brand new album, From the Eagle’s Nest, is Duke’s attempt to discern the music behind the melodies of various tunes.

The music behind the melody is the oldest music of the tribe of humanity, the music that resonates most deeply in the human psyche. The Neanderthals played a bone flute tuned much the same as the Native American flute.

Anthropologists tell us that we are all descended from a woman who lived 180,000 years ago. Linguists attempt to trace back to discern what language she used, the language from which all languages have developed. Likewise, what lullabies did she sing? That would be the earliest music from which all music has developed. But, more on this will be forthcoming.

Duke Addicks’ new CD
FROM THE EAGLE’S NEST


Purchase for
$14.99 plus shipping from:
Katie Lowry’s Flute Shop.
To purchase the CD,
phone Katie Lowry at
651-483-2783 or email her at
khlowry4flutes@gmail.

Duke’s CD may also be purchased at:
The Raptor Center on the St. Paul Campus of the University of Minnesota, and the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN.

FROM THE EAGLE’S NEST is not Indian produced within the meaning of 25 USC 305 et seq.

The playlist, with details as to the tunes upon which the music is based, is in progress, but should be up soon.

View and hear Duke Addicks playing the first set of tunes, Chansons des Hiverants, from the CD, FROM THE EAGLE’S NEST, on YouTube. This is the music Duke Addicks plays when he lets his flute sing!

Duke Addicks plays the music behind the melodies of tribal, ancient, Celtic and early American tunes on Native American Indian style red cedar flutes.

Duke Addicks plays this music to relax the eagles when he joins them in their “Eagle’s Nest,” the living quarters of the permanently incapacitated eagles Duke uses in his educational presentations at the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN. This is the music Duke Addicks plays to soothe the injured eagles at the Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota.

This is the music Duke Addicks played in his performance presentation on Playing Celtic Music on Native American Flutes at the 2008 Conference of the International Native American Flute Association. This is the music Duke Addicks played in his two powerful presentations on the Spirituality of the Native American Flute at the University of Minnesota--Mankato’s 2008 Women & Spirituality Conference.

The Sacred Flute, on this site, contains a discussion of whether the Native American Indian style flutes have a spirit that helps Duke and anyone who plays this type of flute, turn the tunes into music.

This is the music Duke Addicks, whose tribal heritages include a blend of Euharlee Cherokee and Clan Stewart, plays as the Chairman of the multi-tribal Shakopee American Indian Center. This is the music Duke Addicks plays as fluteplayer, storyteller and Chief Justice for the Upper Mississippi Mdewakanton (Dakota/Sioux) Indian Community. This is the music Duke Addicks plays as a fur trade era re-enactor and member of LaCompagnie des Hiverants de la Riviere Sainte Pierre.

Duke Addicks plays a Stephen De Ruby A-minor trail flute at the Stevens House front porch in Minnehaha Park, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

This is his best flute for playing outdoors in any weather: always a good strong sound that carries a long way, always in tune.

Duke also carries a DeRuby A-minor cedar flute which produces a fuller, softer tone.


DUKE ADDICKS PLAYS AND TELLS NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN FLUTE MUSIC, LEGENDS AND LORE,  
(AND  TELLS UPPER MISSISSIPPI RIVER HISTORY STORIES—see his storyteller web page

A master storyteller and accomplished performer on the Native American Indian style flutes, Duke Addicks, whose tribal heritages includes Euharlee Cherokee and Clan Stewart, blends these cultural and genetic heritages in his flute playing. He states: “When I play the flute, all I am doing is giving the spirit that dwells in the flute breath so that together the spirit and I can produce songs that capture the essence of the earliest music of humanity hidden behind the melodies of tunes.”

See the page about the Spirituality of the Native American Indian flute for more on this attitude toward playing this instrument.

Duke Addicks is the storyteller and fluteplayer for the Upper Mississippi Mdewakanton (Dakota/Sioux) Indian Community, Chairman of the Shakopee American Indian Center, and a fur trade era re-enactor and member of LaCompagnie des Hiverants de la Riviere Sainte Pierre.

He gives his educational programs about eagles at the National Eagle Center, The Raptor Center at the University of Minnesota, the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge and for many other organizations.

He has made presentations and performed at the 2006 and 2008 Conferences of the International Native American and World Flute Association, and at the University of Minnesota—Mankato’s 2008 Women & Spirituality Conference, and before hundreds of audiences, and on radio and television programs.

His music and stories reflect his blend of his American Indian (Euharlee Cherokee) and Celtic (Clan Stewart) tribal heritages. He is an accomplished player of Tribal, Ancient, Celtic and Early American Music on Native American Indian style flutes.

He is also a master storyteller, and for over half a century has shared stories about American Indian people whose lives influenced the course of Fur Trade Era history of the Upper Mississippi. His stories are best for adults and older children, but his music is enjoyed by everyone of every age, and especially enjoyed by the eagles at the National Eagle Center who sometimes even sing along with his tunes.

Click here for Duke's Storyteller Page

Duke plays a ceremonial conch shell trumpet he received from internationally famous Mexican musician Xavier Quijas Yxayotl.

Fragments of Gulf of Mexico conch shells have been found associated with burials over a ten thousand year period in the Upper Mississippi region. Tribes along the Gulf coast and in Southeastern United States traditionally played conch shell trumpets.

The Indians associated with the Mississippian Culture and their descendents used conch shells in a similar fashion, Duke's Echota Cherokee ancestors used conch trumpets to communicate from mountain to mountain in the Southern Appalachians as well as for ceremonial purposes.